Saturday, June 30, 2012

Good morning Gifs




Morning Gifs





Morning Gifs




Frugal


Awesome-outdoor-patio-space


http://www.tiphero.com/tips_6086_how-to-create-an-awesome-outdoor-patio-space.html

Free seeds


http://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garden/5-ways-get-free-seeds-your-garden.html


21 Ways To Use Old Coffee Grounds


1. Soften and add shine to hair. When washing your hair, rub coffee grounds through wet hair and rinse. For brown hair, coffee grounds add highlights.
2. Use coffee grounds as an exfoliant for skin. Pat on skin, massage over skin, rinse.
3. Add coffee grounds to your skin mask beauty routine.
4. Make homemade tattoos (temporary) with henna and coffee grounds.
5. Fertilize plants. Old coffee grounds are nutrient-rich for plants that thrive in an acidic soil.
6. Add used coffee grounds to the pots of indoor plants.
7. Work used coffee grounds into your garden soil before seed planting. After your plants start to emerge, work in coffee grounds near the plants. Used coffee grounds are said to repel snails and slugs as well as adding nutrients to the soil.
8. Increase your carrot and radish harvest by mixing seeds with dry coffee grounds before planting the seeds.
9. Use coffee grounds to repel ants.
10. Keep cats from using your garden as a kitty box by spreading used coffee grounds and orange peels throughout flower beds.
11. Deodorize a freezer. Place a bowl with used coffee grounds in the freezer to remove unwanted odors. Add a few drops of vanilla to coffee grounds.
12. Rub coffee grounds on hands to get rid of smells from chopping or cutting up pungent foods.
13. Make a used coffee grounds sachet. Fill old nylons or cheescloth with dry used coffee grounds. Hang in closets to absorb odors.
14. When you need an abrasive cleaner, coffee grounds can be used. Be careful of any surfaces that might stain.
15. Remove furniture scratches with wet coffee grounds.
16. Got a fireplace? Sprinkle wet coffee grounds over the ashes to keep from becoming engulfed in the plume of dust ashes create when you need to remove them.
17. Dye fabric, paper or Easter eggs. Simply add used coffee grounds to warm water and let sit a bit to create a dye.
18. After you give your dog a bath, rub coffee grounds through the coat of your pet. Coffee grounds are said to repel fleas.
19. Keep bait worms alive by mixing coffee grounds into the soil before you add worms.
20. Grow mushrooms on old coffee grounds.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Middle-Eastern Pita Sandwiches


Delicious and healthy, too. I usually double the dressing ingredients. You can use parsley or fresh mint instead of cilantro. You can also add some well drained, diced cucumber to the salad.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground lamb
  • 3/4 cup fresh bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 4 pita breads
  • 2 cups torn salad greens
  • 1/2 cup grated carrot
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
  • 1 large tomato, diced
Dressing:
  • 1 (8 3/4 oz.) can garbanzo beans, drained
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped parsley
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1/4 tsp. dillweed

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Mix well the lamb, bread crumbs, raisin, eggs, cilantro, garlic, lemon juice, and water. Shape into 16 meatballs and bake, uncovered, for 20 minutes. I use my broiler pan so that the meatballs drain into the bottom pan, and don't sit in the grease.
Meanwhile, mix the salad greens, carrot, scallions, and tomato in a bowl, and make the dressing: mix all the ingredients for the dressing in a blender or food processor. Cover and process until smooth (or mash the beans thoroughly with a fork, add the remaining ingredients, and mix well). Set aside.
To assemble: A few minutes before the meatballs are browned and well done, put the pitas in the oven. Use one pita for each sandwich. This is also very good with na'an, wraps, or squaw bread. Put 4 meatballs on each piece of bread. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. dressing, top with salad mix, and drizzle with another Tbsp. dressing. If you have fresh mint, it is a delicious garnish.
Servings:4
Prep Time:30 Minutes
Cooking Time:20 Minutes
Source: The Sun-Maid Cookbook, 1980

Tuna Melts for Two


In tough economic times like these, I always keep cans of tuna in my pantry. Rather than just making the regular boring tuna sandwich, tuna melts are still cheap and tasty.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of tuna
  • 2 Tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbsp. onion
  • 2 Tbsp. relish
  • splash of Tabasco sauce
  • splash of Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 slices of bread
  • Cheddar or Mozzarella cheese

Directions:


Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Put tuna, mayonnaise, onion, relish, Tabasco and Worcestershire in a bowl and mix well using a fork. Lay your bread out on a baking sheet, spread mixture evenly on each slice. Generously grate cheese over each. Bake for 10 minutes.

Servings:2 to 4
Prep Time:5 Minutes
Cooking Time:10 Minutes
By Patricia from Maple Falls, WA

Tuna Melts For Two From Daughter Dusty

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of White tuna
  • 3 Tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 1/2 of a Chopped Walla Walla onion
  • 1 Tsp. garlic Crushed
  • 4 Chopped Sweet Pickles
  • splash of Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 slices of bread
  • Cheddar or Swiss cheese
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Directions:


Preheat Skillet on med heat.  Mix  tuna, mayonnaise, onion, pickles, garlic and Worcestershire in a bowl and mix well using a fork. Lay your bread out and butter one side of each piece. Spread mixture evenly on each slice. Generously grate cheese over each. Fry slowly each side until brown and crispy.
Serve Hot

Servings:2 to 4
Prep Time:5 Minutes
Cooking Time:10 Minutes
By Dusty from Washougal Wa

Italian Beef Sandwiches


Italian Beef Sandwiches

 Delicious!

Ingredients:

  • 8 lbs. rolled beef roast
  • 7 1/2 cups water
  • 4 beef bouillon cubes
  • 1 Tbsp. oregano
  • 8 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 Tbsp. basil
  • 2 pkg. dry Italian dressing mix
  • 1/3 cup oil

Directions:


Bake the roast and slice thin. Mix remaining ingredients in saucepan, bring to boil and pour over sliced beef. Marinate for 2-4 days in refrigerator. Heat before serving. Serve on hoagie-style buns.

Servings:12-18
Prep Time:2-4 Days
Cooking Time:varies - long enough to cook roast
By Robin from Washington, IA

Chinese Perennial Primrose


My daughter was asked to find me a perennial primrose and came home with this little darling.
I will be planting it in the front somewhere.




Primula -vialii
 ________________________________________________ 
Family: Primulaceae
Genus: Primula (PRIM-yew-luh) (Info)
Species: vialii (vy-AL-ee-eye) (Info)

Comman Name: Chinese Perennial Primrose

Category:
Perennials
Height:
12-18 in. (30-45 cm)
18-24 in. (45-60 cm)
Spacing:
9-12 in. (22-30 cm)
Hardiness:
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)
Sun Exposure:
Light Shade
Danger:
Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction
Bloom Color:
Violet/Lavender
Bloom Time:
Late Spring/Early Summer
Mid Summer
Foliage:
Deciduous
Other details:
Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings
Soil pH requirements:
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
Patent Information:
Non-patented
Propagation Methods:
By dividing the rootball
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall
From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse
From seed; stratify if sowing indoors
Seed Collecting:
Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds
Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds
Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Friday, June 22, 2012

Tinkerbelle Lilac


I have two planted in the front yard and this is there second year.
The bees and butterflies spent weeks on them.
I recommend this little lilac and will be updateing photos

____________________________________________________
Tinkerbelle Lilac
Syringa "Tinkerbelle"
Syringa "Tinkerbelle" flowers
This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid
Height: 5 feet
Spread: 4 feet
Sunlight:    Full
Hardiness Zone: 3b
Group/Class: Fairytale Series Lilac

Description:
A new hybrid introduction related to the Meyer lilac, featuring showy spikes
 of spicy fragrant true pink flowers in late spring, small rounded foliage and
 a compact habit of growth; neat and tidy, an excellent garden shrub; full sun
 and well-drained soil
Ornamental Features:
Tinkerbelle Lilac is blanketed in stunning panicles of fragrant pink flowers at
the ends of the branches in late spring, which emerge from distinctive crimson
 flower buds. The flowers are excellent for cutting. It has dark green foliage
 throughout the season. The small pointy leaves do not develop any appreciable fall
color. The fruit is not ornamentally significant. The smooth gray bark is not
particularly outstanding.
Landscape Attributes:
Tinkerbelle Lilac is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less
 rounded form. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants
 with less refined foliage.
This is a relatively low maintenance shrub, and should only be pruned after flowering
 to avoid removing any of the current season's flowers. It is a good choice for
 attracting butterflies to your yard. It has no significant negative characteristics.
Tinkerbelle Lilac is recommended for the following landscape applications;
General Garden Use
Mass Planting
Hedges/Screening
Accent
Plant Characteristics:

Tinkerbelle Lilac will grow to be about 5 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 5 feet.
 It tends to fill out right to the ground and therefore doesn't necessarily require facer
plants in front, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a slow rate,
 and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 30 years.

This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. It is very adaptable to both dry
 and moist locations, and should do just fine under average home landscape
conditions. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban
pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

What I want in a man




What I want in a Man, Original List




1. Handsome
2. Charming 
3. Financially successful
4. A caring listener
5. Witty
6. In good shape
7. Dresses with style
8. Appreciates finer things
9. Full of thoughtful surprises 



What I Want in a Man, Revised List (age 32) 



1. Nice looking
2. Opens car doors, holds chairs
3. Has enough money for a nice dinner 
4. Listens more than talks
5. Laughs at my jokes
6. Carries bags of groceries with ease
7. Owns at least one tie
8. Appreciates a good home-cooked meal
9. Remembers birthdays and anniversaries 



What I Want in a Man, Revised List (age 42) 



1. Not too ugly
2. Doesn't drive off until I'm in the car
3. Works steady - splurges on dinner out occasionally
4. Nods head when I'm talking
5. Usually remembers punch lines of jokes
6. Is in good enough shape to rearrange the furniture 
7. Wears a shirt that covers his stomach
8. Knows not to buy champagne with screw-top lids
9. Remembers to put the toilet seat down
10. Shaves most weekends 



What I Want in a Man, Revised List (age 52) 



1. Keeps hair in nose and ears trimmed
2. Doesn't belch or scratch in public
3. Doesn't borrow money too often
4. Doesn't nod off to sleep when I'm venting
5.. Doesn't re-tell the same joke too many times
6.. Is in good enough shape to get off the couch on weekends
7. Usually wears matching socks and fresh underwear
8. Appreciates a good TV dinner
9. Remembers your name on occasion
10.. Shaves some weekends 



What I Want in a Man, Revised List (age 62) 



1. Doesn't scare small children
2. Remembers where bathroom is
3. Doesn't require much money for upkeep
4. Only snores lightly when asleep, doesn't fart in public
5. Remembers why he's laughing
6.. Is in good enough shape to stand up by himself
7. Usually wears some clothes
8. Likes soft foods
9. Remembers where he left his teeth
10. Remembers that it's the weekend 


What I Want in a Man, Revised List (age 72) 


1.   BREATHING 
2.  DOESN'T MISS THE TOILET 

KEEP READING, THERE'S MORE BELOW 



AFTER  BEING MARRIED FOR 44 YEARS, I TOOK A 
CAREFUL  LOOK AT MY WIFE ONE  DAY  AND SAID, 
"Darling, 44 YEARS AGO WE HAD A CHEAP APARTMENT, 
A CHEAP  CAR,  SLEPT ON A SOFA BED AND WATCHED 
A 10-INCH BLACK  AND WHITE TV, BUT I GOT  TO SLEEP
EVERY NIGHT WITH A HOT 25-YEAR-OLD  GIRL.  
NOW I HAVE A $500,000.00 HOME, A $45,000.00 CAR, 
NICE BIG BED AND PLASMA SCREEN TV, BUT I'M SLEEPING
WITH A 65-YEAR-OLD WOMAN.  IT SEEMS TO ME THAT
YOU'RE NOT HOLDING UP YOUR SIDE OF THINGS." 



MY WIFE IS A VERY REASONABLE WOMAN.  SHE TOLD
ME TO GO OUT AND FIND A HOT 25-YEAR-OLD GAL,
AND SHE WOULD MAKE SURE THAT I WOULD ONCE 
AGAIN BE LIVING IN A CHEAP APARTMENT, DRIVING 
A CHEAP CAR, SLEEPING ON A SOFA BED AND WATCHING
A 10-INCH BLACK AND WHITE  TV. 

AREN'T OLDER WOMEN GREAT? THEY REALLY KNOW
HOW TO SOLVE YOUR MID-LIFE CRISIS..

SEND THIS TO THE WOMEN WHO WILL ENJOY
READING IT, AND TO THE MEN WHO CAN HANDLE IT!!!

Leek Casserole






Leek Casserole


Ingredients

  • 4 lbs. potatoes, mashed
  • 1 lb. bacon, cooked and chopped
  • 4 medium leek
  • 3 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 Tbsp. flour
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 3 cups grated cheddar
  • salt and pepper

Directions

Slice Leek into thin rings and cook in water with salt until tender. Drain the leeks well and set aside.

In a pan melt the butter, then stir in flour. Once it's blended well, stir in the milk a little at a time, making a white sauce. Remove from heat and stir in 2 cups of cheddar. You could add spices of your choice at this point, such as nutmeg. Add the cooked leeks to the sauce and stir well.
Take 1/2 of the mashed potatoes and make a layer in a 9X13 inch pan. Next layer in the leek, then the rest of the potatoes. Cover with last cup of cheese, and sprinkle with bacon.
Bake in 350 degree F oven for 30 minutes or until bubbly.
Source: This is one of my Mom's standby recipes that her family of 9 children enjoyed without complaining!
By LovingLynden from Lynden, WA

Good morning Gif


Onion Potato Pie


Onion Potato Pie

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups shredded hash browns (it calls for frozen, but I use boiled, grated potatoes)
  • 5 Tbsp. melted butter (You know me, low fat. I used 3 Tbsp. light olive oil.)
  • 1/2 tsp. salt.
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup sweet pepper (red or green)
  • 1 cup diced ham - optional (It didn't call for any meat, but I had some leftover ham to add.)
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (any kind you like cheddar, Swiss, or low fat *smile* Mozzarella)
  • 3 eggs slightly beaten together with 1/3 cup of milk

Directions:

Mix hash browns and 5 Tbsp. melted butter (or 3 Tbsp. olive oil), and salt. Press this mixture into the bottom and around the sides of a greased 9 inch pie pan.
Bake at 425 degrees F for 25-30 or until edges are browned. Cool to room temperature. Reduce the oven to 350 degrees F.
Saute onion, pepper and ham in remaining butter or oil until pepper and onion is tender. Spoon into potato crust. Sprinkle the cheese over the onion mixture.
Pour the egg-milk mixture over the top. Bake 20-25 minutes at 350 degrees F or until knife inserted near the center comes out clean.
Let stand 5 minutes before serving. 6-8 servings.
Very good leftovers to heat in the microwave. This could be started earlier in the day, and refrigerated. You could even bake the crust ahead, then just pour in the ingredients and bake as directed. If the ingredients are cold from the fridge, it might take a few minutes extra to bake it.
By Harlean from Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Monday, June 18, 2012

Another Chiffon Flower Tutorial

This is another much simpler chiffon Flower tutorial.

Decline of our Birds

Just me or can anyone else figure out if you take the food away the birds will die ??

Common Birds In Decline

What's happening to birds we know and love?
                   
Audubon's unprecedented analysis of forty years of citizen-science bird population data from our own Christmas Bird Count plus the Breeding Bird Survey reveals the alarming decline of many of our most common and beloved birds.

Since 1967 the average population of the common birds in steepest decline
 has fallen by 68 percent; some individual species nose-dived as much as 80
 percent. All 20 birds on the national Common Birds in Decline list lost at least
 half their populations in just four decades.
The findings point to serious problems with both local habitats and national
environmental trends. Only citizen action can make a difference for the birds
 and the state of our future.

Which Species? Why?

________________________________________________

Invasive Plants 


In some species, cultivars of a perennial are not as invasive as others. Use this list to check into the
plants you are considering for your garden.

List

Achillea spp. (Yarrow) - invasive roots
Aegopodium spp. (Goutweed) - reseeds, invasive roots, use in confined areas
Ajuga (Bugleweed) - invasive roots, excellent ground cover in shade, use in confined areas

Ajuga (Bugleweed) - invasive roots, excellent ground cover in shade, use in confined areas
Anchusa spp  - reseeds, invasive roots
Artemesia spp. (esp. Wormwood) - invasive roots
Borago officinalis (Borage) - reseeds, invasive roots
Campanula rapunculoides (Creeping bellflower) – invasive roots
Centaurea cyanus (Bachelor button) – reseeds
Cerastium tomentosum (Snow in the summer) - invasive roots, can overwhelm desirable plants
           in a rock garden.                        
Chrysarrthenium parthenium (Feverfew) - reseeds
Convollaria majalis (Lily of the Valley) - invasive roots, excellent ground cover if confined
Leucanthamum sp. (Oxeye daisy, Shasta daisy) - reseeds, invasive roots
Lunaria annua (Money plant) - reseeds
Lysimachia nummularia  (Creeping Jenny, Creeping Charlie) - invasive roots
Lythrum salicaria (Purple loosestrife) – noxious weed, DO NOT PLANT
Macleaya cordata (Plume poppy) - reseeds, invasive roots, use in large containers
Mentha  (Mints, esp. Catnip) - reseeds, invasive roots
Monarda didyma (Beebalm) - invasive roots
Myosotis (Forget-me-not) - reseeds
Oenothera spp. (Evening Primrose, esp. speciosa ‘Rosea’) - invasive roots
Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper) - reseeds
Phalaris arundinacea var. picta (Ribbon grass) - invasive roots, confine in a container
Physalis alkekengi (Chinese lantern) - invasive roots
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient plant) - reseeds, invasive roots  
Polygonum cuspidatum (False bamboo, Japanese Knotweed) - invasive roots
Rosa (Roses, esp. wild roses, brambles) - invasive roots, use in native plantings or where
                                                                   the roots can  be confined
Sedum spp.  esp. ‘Golden Acre’ - this and other sedums drop pieces that will re-root
Stach’s bysantina (Lamb’s ear) - creeping stems root and spread
Tradescantia virginiana (Spiderwort) - invasive roots
Veronica spp. (Speedwells, esp. creeping speedwell) - invasive roots, pieces drop off and re-root
Viola spp. (esp. Viola odorata) - reseeds and becomes a problem in lawns
Yucca spp. - invasive roots

Sunday, June 17, 2012

Sea Thrift in the Little Yard


Armeria maritima
Common Name: sea thrift

Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Plumbaginaceae
Zone: 4 to 8
Native Range: Mountain and coastal areas in the northern hemisphere
Height: 0.5 to 1 feet
Spread: 0.5 to 1 feet
Bloom Time: April to May
Bloom Color: Pink, White
Bloom Description: Pink to white
Sun: Full sun
Water: Dry
Maintenance: Medium
Flowers: Showy Flowers
Tolerates: Dry Soil, Shallow, Rocky Soil, Drought
Uses: Groundcover, Will Naturalize

Culture:
Best grown in infertile, dry, well-drained soils in full sun.
Foliage mounds tend to rot in the center if grown in moist,
 fertile soils or in heavy clay. Good drainage is essential.
 Deadhead spend flower stems to encourage additional bloom.

Noteworthy Characteristics
Thrift or sea pink is a compact, low-growing plant which forms a dense,
mounded tuft of stiff, linear, grass-like, dark green leaves (to 4" tall).
Tufts will spread slowly to 8-12" wide. Tiny, pink to white flowers
bloom in mid spring in globular clusters (3/4-1" wide) atop slender,
naked stalks rising well above the foliage to 6-10" tall. Sporadic
additional flowering may occur throughout the summer.
Flower clusters are subtended by purplish, papery bracts.
In the wild, thrift or sea pink commonly grows in saline environments
along coastal areas where few other plants can grow well,
hence the common name.

Problems No serious insect or disease problems.

The Little Pink Mounds in the back and around the tree is the Sea Thrift
Right on the tree trunk are chives ready to go to seed.
.

More on the Little Yard Boxwoods


Buxus microphylla japonica 'Winter Gem'

Excellent evergreen shrub for small hedges.
Among the hardiest of Boxwoods, the rich green foliage acquires
a golden bronze hue through winter, returning to green in spring.
Evergreen.

Botanical Pronunciation: BUK-sus mik-ro-FIL-la
Key feature: Hedge Plant
Plant type: Shrub
Deciduous/evergreen: Evergreen
Cold hardiness zones: 5 - 9
Light needs: Partial to full sun
Water Needs: Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average landscape size: Moderate growing 4 to 6 ft. tall and wide, when unpruned.
Growth rate: Moderate
Flower color: Yellow
Blooms: Inconspicuous
Foliage color: Green

 
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep,
 extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins
 in spring. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear annually to shape. Pruning time: summer
after flowering.

Design Ideas
This is the classic hedge plant. Its dense, evergreen growth makes it perfect for
shearing into a small, formal hedge. Ideal for defining different spaces in the garden
 or for a tidy foundation cover-up. It is especially lovely against red brick. Use as a
 partition to divide your front yard or driveway from your neighbor's. Also beautiful
as background foliage. Creates lovely topiaries, particularly in cone shapes if planted
where it snows. An excellent plant for parterres and hedge mazes. Keeps its color over winter.

Companion Plants
Boxwood is so versatile and offers a nice backdrop to a variety of low growing
shrubs and perennials. If kept more natural in shape, pair with Lilac, Burning Bush,
 Smoke Tree and Japanese Rose. For a formal appearance or knot garden, combine
 with topiary forms, fragrant plants and culinary herbs such as Germander,
Rosemary and Sage.

History
Also known as B. harlandii, this species is native to Japan. Boxwood is so
named because its very hard wood was valued in ancient times for making
 boxes and small containers.

My Little Yard this week June 17 2012





The Little Yard

Work Continues on the little yard.
The last 2 weeks have been a winter gem boxwood Hedge.
Lowes has them still on unmarked sale at 12.94 each for the 2 1/2 gallon size.
Also put in 6 candytufts along the backside.

We hit a 5 foot by 3 foot blue basalt rock and took 5 hours and a jack hammer to break off about 8 inches across the front.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Paper Lantern how to



How to found HERE

Animals at there best


My Big fat gypsy American WEdding

Has everyone seen this. ?
What a fun show

http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/tv/my-big-fat-american-gypsy-wedding


MY BIG FAT AMERICAN GYPSY WEDDING GARTER GIVEAWAY

Traveling For Quilts

Traveling art Gallery For quilts can be found hERE

Quiltart List





Quiltart, the Internet's largest mailing list for contemporary art quilters,
 was established in 1995 as a means for those interested in innovative,
 contemporary art quilting to share, learn and grow.
Find it HERE






Morning Gifs






Good morning Rain and snow June 5th

Good morning We had a beautiful couple of days now,
 rain and cold again for the last three.
Hubby started the next garden project and has been stopped by the rain.

A boxwood hedge soon to run around the tiny yard.

Friday, June 1, 2012

How plastic bottles can lighten up the darkness.


Brilliant !
This is so INGENIOUS!! It's true that necessity 
is the mother of all invention. 
How amazing and creative is this? We take something so simple as windows
and sunlight for granted - a luxury in a third world country.
 

Click here http://www.wimp.com/lightenup/  for an incredible video
How plastic bottles can lighten up the darkness.

Life Toughts


"LIFE" THOUGHTS BY 'DUCKY'


I saw a woman wearing a sweat shirt with 'Guess' on it.
So I said 'Implants?' She hit me.

Marriage changes passion.
Suddenly you're in bed with a relative.

Now that food has replaced sex in my life, I can't even get into my own pants.

How come we choose from just two people to run for president and over fifty for Miss America ?

When I was young we used to go 'skinny dipping,' now I just 'chunky dunk.'

I signed up for an exercise class and was told to wear loose fitting clothing.. If I HAD any loose fitting clothing, I wouldn't have signed up in the first place!

Wouldn't it be nice if whenever we messed up our life we could simply press 'Ctrl Alt Delete' and start all over? AMEN, AMEN!

Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

Wouldn't you know it....
Brain cells come and brain cells go, but FAT cells live forever.

Why is it that our children can't read a Bible in school, but they can in prison?
A completely brilliant question!!

Bumper sticker of the year:
'If you can read this, thank a teacher -
And, since it's in English, thank a soldier'

Why do I have to swear on the Bible in court when the Ten Commandments cannot be displayed outside?
Another completely brilliant question!!
And remember:
Life is like a roll of toilet paper.
The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.